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MarkDUK

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  1. Thanks
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Killercroc1978 in Keeping on keeping on.   
    Good on you Scott. 
    Wishing you well moving forward. 
    So many great songs with 'Keep on keeping on'. My favourite is Primal Scream's Country Girl
  2. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Lindaward in Recovery   
    Dave, welcome to the forum and to the survivors club. Bluntly, sepsis has made a good effort in trying to kill you and would have done so but for top ambulance people,antibiotics and your good health. If someone had met you late at night and kicked you about, strangled you, bruised you internally and poisoned you before leaving you I guess you'd feel dreadful for weeks after and this is what sepsis has done. Beating it early gives you a big chance of a full recovery although in the next few weeks you can feel exhausted and suffer pain. But as I said, it's understandable.
    Most folks make a full recovery and often its because they have listened to their body regarding tiredness and done no more than able to do. Keep positive and please share youe ongoing improvements. Mark
  3. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Moz in Sepsis Support Groups   
    Thank you to everyone who came to our meet up in York today, with special thanks to Larry for making the journey t'north.
  4. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in Sepsis Support Groups   
    Thank you to everyone who came to our meet up in York today, with special thanks to Larry for making the journey t'north.
  5. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from davegore in Recovery   
    Dave, welcome to the forum and to the survivors club. Bluntly, sepsis has made a good effort in trying to kill you and would have done so but for top ambulance people,antibiotics and your good health. If someone had met you late at night and kicked you about, strangled you, bruised you internally and poisoned you before leaving you I guess you'd feel dreadful for weeks after and this is what sepsis has done. Beating it early gives you a big chance of a full recovery although in the next few weeks you can feel exhausted and suffer pain. But as I said, it's understandable.
    Most folks make a full recovery and often its because they have listened to their body regarding tiredness and done no more than able to do. Keep positive and please share youe ongoing improvements. Mark
  6. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to Mark Sollis in How long to feel well again?   
    Hi Mand
     
    Thanks for joining the group and for posting - I know it must be a worrying time coming out of hospital after having Sepsis
     
    Can I suggest you contact the Trust on their freephone number. They are a fantastic resource and have staff on hand who can talk with you and provide the support and assistance you need - without typing.
     
    Please give them a call on 0800 389 6255
     
    Take care
     
    Mark
  7. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to Gillianflutes in My Beautiful mum   
    So sorry to read your post. Focus on the good memories you do have. Hard to do that just now but she would want you to do that. I know I would wish that for my children. Xx
  8. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to Balley77 in My Beautiful mum   
    Lala
     
    So sorry to hear your sad news. You've probably read my previous posts, and seen that I lost my mum just over 3 years ago. I know exactly what you're going through.
     
    Other illnesses (like Cancer) are equally as horrific to witness, but at least in those circumstances, you can prepare, and have a chance to say goodbye. The next few months will probably go by in a blur. I hope you have some support, and are not alone?
     
    Feel free to email me, if you need to, as I wish I'd had someone when I was in your position. Sarah@valcot.com
     
    Take each day as it comes. One day at a time xx
  9. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to red squirrel in Raising awareness within the NHS   
    Members have recently posted about how they can and do raise awareness within the NHS regarding sepsis.this is for anyone who would wish to do the same but are unsure about how to make a start.You dont have to be a patient/survivor to do this, although patients are encouraged.
    In the first instance you can sign up to your local hospital news letter either by post or email this will inform you of any new initiatives taking place and how you may help.
    Most hospitals now have a dedicated patient and public involvement department and in some cases can be contacted directly.where you could help in areas such as.....
     
    Become a patient leader
    Take part in projects and initiatives
    Joining the register of readers to review patient information leaflets
    Take part in decisions that affect how services operate
    Join a patient- led assessment team
    How to plan and provide services
    Help junior and interns become more patient aware
    take part in how to develop and change the way they provide services
    Become a secret shopper for the hospital.
     
    there are others also but they vary by region and they are not all sepsis- related
    iv done some of these myself and have found them on the whole to be immensely rewarding,
    Recovering patients may find some of these activities a little tiring as some may involve  a whole day visiting wards,  form filling and travel so pace yourself.some hospitals can arrange travel in certain circumstances also.
     
     
    regards Red
  10. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from crossland in Post Sepsis Syndrome   
    I'm going to do that David. What a great way to bring sepsis awareness to those on the frontline. Thanks for posting, Mark
  11. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from crossland in Post Sepsis Syndrome   
    That's interesting Supertractorman. How did you get involved in the Patient Bank Programme? I see real benefits in this.
    Mark
  12. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to Balley77 in Loss of husband   
    Hi Tricia
     
    Sorry for delay, hadn't realised you'd replied!
     
    A dog sounds an excellent idea!
     
    I tried a few things, to force myself out of the house. My husband tried to persuade me to take up a hobby. I found Saturday's the worst, as I'd often meet my mum for shopping. I had a go at a pottery class, which was nice but not very exciting. Eventually took up target pistol shooting, and the regular contact and friendships made there have been great. I love it and it is actually something I am good at.
     
    Sorry you don't live any closer, but if you want to keep in touch by email, please do. My address is:
    Sarah@valcot.com
     
    Take care
    Sarah
  13. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in Sepsis Support Groups   
    Hi Linda (so much better than Moz!) , I do hope you can make it and at least keep me company . Larry a medic from the Trust will also be there. Mark
  14. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Moz in Sepsis Support Groups   
    York group details
  15. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in Post Sepsis Syndrome   
    That's interesting Supertractorman. How did you get involved in the Patient Bank Programme? I see real benefits in this.
    Mark
  16. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to Supertractorman in Post Sepsis Syndrome   
    The Dundee University and Ninewells Hospital were advertising and asking patients attending the hospital if they would like to help. I went along to an introductory meeting to learn about what it was about. Apparently this has been going on for about 10 years here and other teaching hospitals are now taking it up. They are looking for patients who have certain conditions, maybe a heart flutter or arthritis to answer questions and show that condition or people who will act out a condition such as a Heart Attack, Incontinence, Sepsis, leg and ankle pains etc or maybe act out a grieving or aggressive parent or relative. They also have replica wards which are identical to any hospital ward and trainee nurses have to take temperatures, blood pressure, help patients to the loo and answer questions as if you are a first time visitor as a patient to the hospital. They will also have scenes where the Trainee Doctor is left in charge of the ward and events happen to see how he/she reacts. I find it very interesting and a way of helping trainee Drs, Nurses & Pharmacists get practical training on real people.  If you are interested contact your nearest teaching hospital to see if they have a scheme. 
     
    David
  17. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to pennym in Thank You UK Sepsis Trust   
    Hi, I have a similar story to Marks niece. In 2014 whilst 32 weeks pregnant I contracted sepsis through a kidney infection. I started have severe aching, shivering etc and had a temperature of 39.7 degrees. My doctors couldn't fit me in for over a week despite my symptoms and the fact that I was pregnant so I took myself to the maternity ward at my local hospital. I was checked over very briefly and told there was nothing wrong and swiftly sent home. My symptoms worsened over night so the next day not knowing what to do I went to a drop in clinic where I waited over 2 hours to be seen. The locus doctor recognised my symptoms and called the hospital and told me to go straight there. I was immediately put on an iv drip in the High Dependency Unit of the maternity ward and luckily a week later I was sent home. The hospital were shocked and surprised to hear I had been in on the previous day but had been dismissed by the staff there. Thank goodness the locus doctor recognised the signs. Thankfully nearly 3 years on I am fit and healthy and only suffer a few small side effects such as extreme tiredness at times. forgetfulness and an occasional odd feeling where I don't feel myself. Eventually I was given the treatment I needed but the knowledge of Sepsis throughout the NHS was very inconsistent. I hope that today this has improved.
  18. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from pennym in Thank You UK Sepsis Trust   
    Back in 2009 (pre Trust) I was sent home from hospital and had to be readmitted and after several hours and with my wife constantly questioning medics I was tested had sepsis and remained in hospital 8 weeks.
     
    In 2017 (post Trust) my neice post natal called an ambulance and was straight away put onto IV antibiotics. She had sepsis but left hospital on oral antibiotics within the week.
     
    What a massive change since UK Sepsis Trust have been raising awareness. They in my opinion saved my neice.
     
    One unfortunate part of the story. Her husband called the maternity ward and told them her symptoms which included high temp, shivering, pain in her legs. He was advised to give her a paracetamol! When he called again due to worsening condition he was told she couldn't come back onto the maternity ward, take her to A&E.
    It's a surprise to me that knowing sepsis is the biggest killer post natal the ward staff were not better trained.
  19. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in Need Reassurance Please   
    Hi Grandmapeggy, welcome to the forum and may I congratulate you for being a 'survivor'
    Sepsis can knock your whole body out of sync and what you are experiencing is quite common regarding taste. In my own case every meal I asked my wife if she had added salt. Everything tasted very salty and in the early days fruit yogurt was about the only thing I enjoyed. It's very early days for you and I'm sure your taste will improve although if you are like me it may never be like it once was but you will again enjoy food just probably different foods. I like very sweet and very sour but cannot eat spicey foods.
    Your comments re your throat does sound as though it's a consequence of all manner of things being shoved in there, not a medic, but I would be inclined to get a medics opinion to rule out an infection. I had what you describe and it turned out to be laryngitis. Keep the faith and give yourself time. Mark
  20. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Pollypockets in Post Sepsis Syndrome   
    Hi and welcome.
    I do hear your frustration and have had similar experiences. I got sepsis in 2009 and the only consultants I saw post hospital were neurosurgeons who wanted to discuss my back operation and not the infection post op and sepsis.
    Yet I do think in recent years this attitude is changing and let's not forget UK Sepsis are relatively new (2012?).
    My advise, share with medics the literature on the website such as PSS and how survivors are affected. Drop some literature off at you local GPs and if confident call them and ask if they had read it. It's our job the survivors to educate and lead. Frustrating yes, but it can be very rewarding when 1 of them listens and understands.
     
    Keep up the good fight,
     
    Mark
  21. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Gillianflutes in Struggling to return to work   
    Hi KiwiGirl,
     
    Thank you for sharing your story.
     
    I also was diagnosed with sepsis and post hospital with PTSD.
    Both cognitively and physically sepsis has meant I am no longer able to do things I could before. In the early months/years I measured myself against my pre sepsis self and this would lead to lack of confidence and upset. It is my opinion that until you are able to accept 'being different' you will not move on and like your new self.
    Cognitively I am hopeless at multi tasking (then again I am a man!) and get quite disorientated when tasked in this way. Furthermore my listening skills have suffered. It's difficult to explain but it is though I have to tell my brain to listen rather than doing this automatically.
     
    Dealing with this - as I've said once you accept you will unlikely return to the person you was (maybe not a bad thing) it will be difficult to appreciate the person you are. Look for positives in the new you that are important in your job. For me I have more compassion that has led to improved work relationships and improved performance from those around me. Because I have to tell myself to listen I am surprisingly a better listener. I celebrate the ability to listen and in doing so find myself listening far more now. Now I am better at delegating tasks, due mainly to not having the energy to now do them myself. Delegation leads to improved job satisfaction to those around you and improves their potential to your organisation.
     
    Tiredness often described on this forum as exhaustion is very common with sepsis survivors. For most it does get better and for the majority of the rest they accept it and either just listen to their body and rest when it tells them or in my case try to not have extremes. Extremes in that I don't push it when feeling ok and then I find I don't have as many 'exhaustion' episodes.
     
    You are doing really well. It's brilliant to hear of the medics in NZ and your company's appreciation of your skillset in accepting a shorter working week. Please be kinder to yourself as you've been through I very scarey period and your body has taken a real beating. Measure yourself against post sepsis and I'm sure you will see how far you have come. A diary often helps others. Note any advancements you make, things that have made you smile and your concerns. Looking back in your diary will confirm you are making good progress.
     
    All the very best,
     
    Mark
  22. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in 1st World Sepsis Congress   
    I found the following very interesting. Real survivors being given an opportunity to tell their stories and concerns for our carers.
     

  23. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from red squirrel in 1st World Sepsis Congress   
    I found the following very interesting. Real survivors being given an opportunity to tell their stories and concerns for our carers.
     

  24. Like
    MarkDUK reacted to hudlet in Newbie needing advice   
    Hi Mark
     
    Thanks for replying. Sorry I haven't responded sooner, half term got in the way and I am still recovering from 2 energetic boys being home with me!! Thanks for your advice on lotions and potions will be getting them in to try.
     
    Thanks
  25. Like
    MarkDUK got a reaction from Mark Sollis in Loosing my mum this year to sepsis   
    Hello Ella, what a tragic story. You can contact UK Sepsis Trust on 0800 389 6255. They have trained people that can help you, alternatively take up Sarah's offer. You have been very brave writing as you have however I do feel now is the time to contact a person for one on one. My thoughts are with you through this traumatic stage in your life. I'm sure your mum (and you in time) will be very grateful you were together when she passed on.
     
    Mark
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