Jump to content
MarkDUK

Is it best to share 'Survivors Information'

Recommended Posts

Hi Folks, I'd really appreciate your thoughts.

 

As I survivor I was relieved to read the information leaflets on UK Sepsis Trust. At the time I couldn't understand why I was having a tough time after beating sepsis and it was through the leaflets I got understanding and real comfort.

 

My niece gave birth this week and was taking back into hospital a day after leaving. She had an urine infection and sepsis. Fortunately the ambulance people administered antibiotics immediately and now 2 days later sepsis isn't a threat and they have taken her off one antibiotic.

Are the leaflets a good thing when sepsis wasn't severe, (my view as I was in hospital for 8 weeks including HDU) and she is likely returning home after only 5 days? Reading again the leaflets they inform across all levels of sepsis but do tend to be relevant most for severe sepsis and I'm worried I will be feeding her fears of something that might not happen. So when is the best time to give the information if at all?

 

Thanks,

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark!

 

I think you pose a great question and I hope my reply helps.

 

As with anything, knowledge is power, and as far as SEPSIS is concerned,it is it's worst enemy. I contracted SEPSIS through a simple scrape on my knee. Had I taken better care of it, chances are I would have never ended up in the hospital for 4 months. But at the time, I had never heard of SEPSIS, let alone the the horrible consequences of having it. Yes, there are circumstances which we have no control over, BUT, if you have already had SEPSIS, then you have the upper hand on prevention and symptoms of possible infection.I feel much more empowered now that I can recognize the "enemy" before it strikes. Of course, there are no lifetime guarantees of not ever contracting SEPSIS again, but at least I know what to look for and what to avoid.

 

Best to you,

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Bob. The leaflets were a great help to me too.

My question though is about my niece who has what I'd call minor sepsis on t b e scale of things, although sepsis is a critical illness. Would a leaflet making you aware of worst case scenario aid recovery for such a person?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark, 

 

I had Sepsis in October, caused by chest and kidney infections. I wasn't escalated to HDU or  even ICU and prior to my admission I was an extremely fit 35 year old. I came home from Hospital and expected to pick up with my life where I left off. I read the Post- sepsis Info leaflets on the site and thought, no those dont apply to me as I was never escalated to ICU. However, I got to about week 6 after discharge and there was not any significant improvement improvement in my energy or feeling better and I was still experiencing high levels of fatigue. I was extremely worried and at this point I rang the Sepsis Trust, who informed me that even if you arent escalated to HDU/ICU it is still possible to suffer from Post-Sepsis Syndrome. So prehaps you could make your niece aware that feeling like normal might take a lot longer than expected and if it does then refer her to the trust?

 

Cheers

Wease 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI Mark ,im really glad your niece,s sepsis was caught very early on,and i hope she goes on to make a full recovery with none or very little long term effects.

But like Wease has already mentioned there may be issues further down the line.by passing on a leaflet all you would be doing is raising awareness,and thats no bad thing,it may assist her or someone she knows one day,

sepsis is still sepsis,and as you and i have so often said , we are not medics and  sometimes even the medics cannot determine how someone may be affected.

 

kind regards

Red

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wease thanks for sharing your story. Red & Bob thanks very much for your views. I thought that giving info would end with psychosomatic symptoms but agree being prepared is safer than ignorance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...