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Terry

Loss of Oliver.

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Our 29 year old son, Oliver, died after four days from Sepsis in January 2014. He came home from work on the Thursday and he saw a doctor on Friday who said it was a viral infection and gave him Co-codamol for a back ache(the back ache indicated to us his kidney problem back). He text me on Saturday saying he had blood in his urine. We took him to a local hospital where he informed them of how he felt and the blood in the urine. We were there five hours and he could not pass urine for a urine test. That hospital passed him on to another hospital miles away with a doctor's letter. That hospital took blood tests and then we waited in the waiting area until 10pm when they said they needed to keep him in overnight. When we saw him on the Sunday afternoon he looked terrible: puffed up, heavy breathing, in pain, unabale to hold a glass properly. I complained of his condition to a nurse and that he had passed little urine since the day before and that he was puffed up and is skin colour was unnatural and that is breathing was bad that he needed to see a doctor. The nurse said the doctor was in A&E and would see our son then. I sat with our son talking to him and he seemed tired so I said we would see him the following day and had told the nurs eof his condition. I rang the hosptal at 10pm that night and a nurse said the doctor's were with him and attending to him. At 11.30pm my wife's mobile went off from the hospital saying to come to the hospital as our son was in a bad way. We arrived at the hospital by 12(God knows how) and we were informed that Oliver had had a heart attack but thye ha dmanaged to get his heart going again and he was in ITU. We saw him about 3 hours or so later after thet had put lines into him and wired him up to a machine. The nurse looking after him was wonderful and did all she could to bring him back. He was in a coma and seemed to be steady, but at 4.30pm, he died. His inquest in still in process so I can not name hospitals or treatment etc. The condition from which he died we were informed was Sepsis, but we are still awaited the final verdict from the coroner. This has high-lighted for us this condition Sepsis and how it needs to be made aware just how deadly it can be.

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Hi Terry,

 

I am so sorry to hear about your great loss. This is really bad. The hospitals struggle to detect sepsis it seems. I am a sepsis survivor, I had sepsis in April this year, mine started as a viral infection, then within 2 weeks had turned in to double pneumonia and sepsis, the hospital A & E Department, failed to recognise I had sepsis and released me after 1 hour, I was told my the A & E Doctor to stop worrying and just relax, she failed to spot my prurple rash on my face which I pointed out to her, my heart rate was up, my blood pressure low, I had all the signs of sepsis on that day I went to A & E, I could not stand up, this was on the Friday day, they performed an X ray, which she told me was clear, gave me anti bitoics and sent me home. It turned out I had pneumonia on the Friday and sepsis, I went home I was severely tired, no appetite at all, not really drinking as such apart from taking medication. I was vomitting bile.

 

Consequently, the next day on Saturday by lunchtime I couldnt walk I was in a deep sleep, not drinking, severly dehydrated, my mother was over that day and called an ambulance as I became unresponsive completely, couldnt move, Paramedic came, he spotted sepsis immediately, which the doctor failed to recognise the previous day, my heart rate was very high, I was tachycardic, could have arrested at any time apparently, he couldnt get an IV line in, my blood had started to coagulate in arms, they rushed me into resus, where doctors were waiting for me, within 20 minutes they had an IV line in my arm, bloods were taken straight away for cultures, an x ray was performed straight away and revealed I had severe pneumonia, the doctors were talking and saying that I should not have been released the day before and was very lucky to respond to the anti bitoics, I was on a heart monitor all night and blood pressure was very low, but monitored every half an hour, I was placed in an acute ward and constantly monitored. My body like your son's was very swollen all over, severe rash,temperasture of 104 degrees, struggling to breathe etc.

 

I was in hospital for 4 days, then released with a lot of antibiotics. To cut a long story short. I did lodge a complaint against the hospital and the doctor that treated me. I have had my complaints meeting with hospital Consultants and clinical director in July this year, I went into the meeting armed with research from British Medical Journal, to which they could not argue with, I can honestly say, that the Consultant over A & E and clinical director admitted I had sepsis on the Friday when released home, they also stated that I was very lucky to be alive the following day, they admitted negligence in front of my son & myself, which was a victory to me. I have since had all of this in writing from the hospital and signed by chief executive of the hospital.

 

Since my case had been discussed at the hospital big meetings they have with all departments, they have now rolled out training now across the hospital with all departments raising awareness of sepsis and used me as their case study, I have had apologies from Consultants in person and stated they had failed me. It is not very often that hospitals admit in person and in writing that they were wrong. I now have lung problems now in my right lung and my lung has collapsed and struggle to breathe and get very out of breathe now, compromising my health now, but I am alive and very grateful but feel anger also as I was a very healthy 45 year old.

 

Also, the Doctor who treated my and failed to diagnose sepsis, turns out to be Romanian,I asked the Consultants where she had done her medical training and it was in Romania not in the UK which I am not a predujiced person, however the hospital have now sent her for re training over at University Hospital in a large City, which I will not name for libel or legal reasons or even state which hospital this was at, apart from it was in the West Midlands area.

 

My advice would be question, question, question, the hospitals as to why this was not detected earlier as you need those answers otherwise you will not heal emotionally until you have those answers, my thoughts are with you at this difficult time and your family and you will get a lot of help and support on this site from survivors but also from people who have lost love ones, I read a post the other night on here about a little girl who died, when I read it I was in tears they would not stop and I have tears in my eyes from your story too.. But ultimately, there needs to be more awareness of this silent killer and I will do what I can to raise this awareness. Feel free to contact me if you need any more advice. Take care.

 

Lyndsey x

 

 

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I am so sorry to hear what you went through Terry. It is frightening how quickly Sepsis strikes, and there is such a small window of opportunity to treat it. If that window is missed or overlooked, it has devastating outcomes.

 

Things are obviously still ongoing with you at the moment, and still very raw. 

 

I am sure you know that we are all with you on this one, and if there is anything we can do, please just ask or PM.

 

Sarah

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Hello Terry.

I too lost a daughter from Sepsis, at the age of 27. She left a 3 week old baby. I am so sorry you have gone through this same horrific experience. To watch your child in ICU, on ventilators and in Hayley's case a lung bypass machine called ECMO is so devastating. To then watch them die is the worst thing imaginable for any parent. I still find it hard to believe it has really happened, that our lives could be so suddenly ripped apart. It is such a devastating illness that is terrifying in the speed in which it takes hold. We seemed to lurch from one crisis to another for 3 weeks, then suddenly she was dead and we weren't really sure what had happened. We waited a very long time for Hayley's inquest and there are still a lot of things I don't fully understand. I hope you get the answers you need and a clear explanation of exactly what happened.

 

Take care

 

Anne 

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